College Students

Some of our clients are high school students who have very few ideas about what to do as far as choosing a major or a college. They think about what they like to do, and which classes are their favorites, and perhaps are considering basing their future education and career on such factors as these.

Aptitude testing is particularly beneficial to anyone in this position, as our testing provides an objective source of information about personal strengths, especially useful if done before he or she has made any decisions about the future.

The Freshman

What about an incoming college freshman who has already been accepted to a few schools? If a student likes to write but also is interested in biology, how would diverging interests affect choosing what to study?

Aptitude testing can provide this student with some indication as to which career would ultimately be more satisfying and enjoyable. Our research has shown that people working in a field that provides an outlet for as many of their aptitudes as possible tend to be happier and more satisfied in their work than those who do not.

A thorough understanding of your aptitudes can help you identify which fields warrant further exploration.

Upperclassmen

Another common scenario is that of college sophomores or juniors who have already chosen a school and a major and are partway through their education. Perhaps they are struggling or feel overwhelmed by the work. Is the issue the major they have chosen? Is it the school they have selected? Perhaps a new class has opened up a world of ideas they hadn't previously considered. Should they change majors or schools?

Before making such decisions, knowledge about where your natural strengths lie would help you determine which path would use your own aptitude pattern.

The Graduating Senior

Consider the about-to-graduate senior who has invested almost four years and thousands of dollars in his or her education. How could aptitude testing help? The most obvious answer is that a knowledge of individual aptitudes can help anyone starting to investigate how to make use of a newly-earned degree.

If a student has studied marketing, clearly he or she is interested in pursuing jobs in that field, but which ones-marketing for a software firm, an investment house, or a hotel chain?

If a student is debating graduate school versus seeking full-time work, learning about whether working with and through others or specializing in a knowledge field could create new ambitions.

Choosing whether to seek opportunities to persuade or design, to conduct research or manage others, or to aim for any of the other alternatives confronting each graduate is what a discussion of natural abilities can help resolve.

The knowledge gained from an understanding of aptitudes can help narrow down such options, making you more directed during your evaluation of your job opportunities and future goals.

Read about how aptitude testing helped a student find a satisfying new college major in From Economics to Film: One Who Dared To Switch.